Art Therapy: An Anti-Stress Colouring Book

Doodle and colour your stress away!

61d6gncxsllI was given a copy of this colouring book, Art Therapy, for Christmas a couple of years ago, before they became the latest craze. It was not until during the past half a year that I seriously got into colouring. Some people scoff and ridicule the idea that colouring can relieve stress, however, in my experience, it really can!

This particular book contains drawings from three different illustrators: Hannah Davies, Richard Merritt and Cindy Wilde; however you would not know it as all the pages are a similar style. The images range from animals, flowers and objects, to basic and complicated patterns.

With hundreds of colouring books to choose from, what makes Art Therapy, and others from the same series, different from the rest? Firstly, most of the patterns have been started for you. Some people may argue this is a negative point, yet I find it quite useful. I use the starting colours as a theme to stick to throughout the page (see above for examples). I like structure and rule following therefore this is a great book for me. Secondly, the book is split into to halves: images and patterns to colour in, and unfinished images and patterns. The second part of the book allows the owner of the book to finish the outlines of the colouring pages however they wish before colouring them in. This helps to nurture and develop illustration skills. I have not attempted these pages yet as I am moving through the book methodically (I did say I like structure and rule following!), I will post examples at a later date.

The paper quality is extremely good, a lot better than many other colouring books I have come across. Even though I do not use them (I only use pencils), this book should be suitable for felt tip pens – although I would avoid Sharpies, they go through everything!

Now the downside… it is a hardback. Not the easiest to colour in with it on your lap whilst watching television (although I manage some how). I have only completed 21 pages so far and I am already worried that it is going to fall apart. Having said that, the other day I noticed that The Works were selling a paper back version! Perhaps invest in that format if you are thinking of buying this book.

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Children’s Picture Books: an evolution of British culture or childish commodities?

That was the title of my thesis I wrote in 2012. I wanted to write about something that interested me, something I would enjoy researching. At this point in my Graphic Design studies I was strongly interested in illustration, but I was aware that there was not enough theory surrounding the topic to use as a foundation of an essay, particularly one that needed to be based around an argument. So, I turned to picture books.

Reading has been a great joy for me – I usually get through over 100 books a year. Like most children I began learning through picture books, where the story was told through images rather than words. It felt natural to combine my love of reading and illustration together to result in the topic of children’s picture books.

However, I could not only write about books; I needed an argument. So, insert another of my passions: history, in particular British history. I decided to look at the evolution of the picture book in regards to the changes in British culture. Were children’s books moving in sync with the changing times, or were they purely a commodity, a way of making money?

Now that I had these elements in place it was easy to find relevant research and build up my argument. I was commended on my choice of question; I was told it was unique and very interesting. I enjoyed writing it – something other students found hard to believe.

For obvious reasons I cannot post my dissertation online, but I would like to share with you, three of the books I gathered for my research that I found extremely interesting and informative. If you are interested in this subject matter I highly recommend you seek these out.

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Puffin By Design: 70 Years of Imagination 1940-2000 
by Phil Baines

I admit that this book was not about picture books, but about children’s books in general. Therefore it was the least informative for my essay. Nonetheless, I would have bought this book regardless as book design is another area that I am greatly interested in.

Puffin By Design is essentially a visual timeline of book covers produced for Puffin (an imprint of Penguin Books) from the date of its formation until the publication of this book in 2010. Although mostly full of imagery, Phil Baines provides an insight into the development of Puffin and the changes in illustration and typography over the seven decades. Readers are shown the changing appearance of the books in order to appeal to youngsters of the era, to encourage them to read (or arguably buy).

Due to the lack of written word, and the fact that Puffin By Design mostly focuses on reading books rather than picture books, this book was the least cited in my thesis. However I could spend hours flicking through this book. It shows what has been successful in the past and thus is full of inspiration for upcoming designers wanting to work in the world of book publishing.

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Children Reading Pictures: Interpreting Visual Texts
by Evelyn Arizpe and Morag Styles

Children Reading Pictures is the result of a two year study, in which the authors interviewed a selection of primary school aged children to discover their understanding and interpretation of the illustrations within picture books.

Whilst not necessarily the most stimulating book to read, it is actually full of really interesting findings. Children are a lot more insightful than the average adult gives them credit for. Some of the interviewees were from migrant families, who had not yet got a grasp on the English language. These children were able to understand the stories to a certain extent purely by analysing the illustrations. When questioned, many were able to relate the images to events in their own lives. What some people may disregard as childish nonsense is actually extremely educational – children can learn as much from pictures as they can from words (and thus, as I argued, are easy targets for consumerism).

One of the more helpful chapters in Children Reading Pictures, in regards to my essay, was the interview and analysis of books by Anthony Browne, who, alongside Lauren Child, was one of the authors I heavily focused on in my writing. As students of English Literature will know, author’s works get ripped apart by teachers and lecturers in order to find meaning that was possibly not intended in the first place. In this case that was not a problem. Browne was able to provide an insight to his intentions when writing and drawing his books, and thus this can be viewed as a reliable source.

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Children’s Picturebooks: The Art of Visual Storytelling
by Martin Salisbury and Morag Styles

This was my favourite book that I bought for my thesis research. I could sit and read this for hours and hours. It was perfect for what I needed. Like with Puffin by DesignChildren’s Picturebooks is a visual timeline from the very first recorded book for children up until the present day (2012). However, this was a book about the INSIDE of the books, the actually stories, rather than the front covers.

Yet Children’s Picturebooks was so much more than a mere timeline. Salisbury looked into the key stages that make a picture book successful: the illustration, the typography, the story lines etc. With examples of famous illustrators, Salisbury demonstrates how artists and authors have kept children interested and managed to keep this dynamic sector of the publishing industry going.

This was perhaps the most cited book in my thesis (I admit I was warned about using it too much). There were chapters about controversial topics and the arguments as to whether children should be subjected to these or not. Could pictures influence the way children think or behave? – a perfect opinion to challenge in my essay!

 

If you are interested in book design, children’s books or illustration, I urge you to take a look at these books. You will not be disappointed.

For those looking for ideas for their own dissertation, I advise you to pick something you are interested in. This will make research less of a chore and much more enjoyable. You may be thinking that there is not enough content to write an essay on your passion, however combined with other elements you are bound to develop a question with a great amount of theory to back you up. Good luck and happy writing!

 

 

Inspiration

Whenever faced with a new design brief, it is always useful to research what has been done before. This helps you to discover what works and what does not work. When stuck for ideas, looking at existing artwork can help to boost your imagination.

Here are some of the books I own that I recommend looking through for design inspiration:

13325960Typography Sketchbooks by Steven Heller and Lita Talarico

This book contains examples of sketchbooks kept by over 100 typographers. Although there are not many final outcomes featured, the selection shows the thought processes behind each typographical composition. Sketchbooks need not be neat and tidy, and there is no right or wrong way to display your thoughts. Typography Sketchbooks reveals what works best for each individual and may inspire you to try and document your work in an alternative way.

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Graphic: Inside the Sketchbooks of the World’s Great Graphic Designers by Steven Heller and Lita Talarico

Similarly to Heller’s Typographic Sketchbooks, this book also shows the sketchbooks of 100 of the worlds most influential designers, including Art Spiegelman, Milton Glaser and Sara Fanelli. Hence the title, Graphic, the subject matter of these sketchbooks cover a broader insight to the mind of a designer, introducing illustration and layout as well as typography.

 

 

9837813Drawn In: A Peek into the Inspiring Sketchbooks of 44 Fine Artists, Illustrators, Graphic Designers, and Cartoonists by Julia Rothman

Drawn In is a similar book to the two above except it includes a wider variety of disciplines. A landscape painter’s sketchbook is going to be very different from a cartoonist or graphic designer’s sketchbook. It also includes interviews with each artist and their opinions on keeping sketchbooks.

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The Picture Book: Contemporary Illustration by Angus Hyland

I highly recommend this book to illustrators looking for inspiration; especially those who are still developing their own style. The Picture Book contains some well known artists as well as promising newbies. Some of the work is very beautiful and uses a range of mediums you may have not even thought of using.

 

 

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Illustration Now! Vol.4 by Julius Wiedermann

150 illustrators working in 2011 are shown in this book. There are other volumes available from different years, but this is the volume I personally own. Some of the work in here inspired me whilst I was working toward my graphic design degree, especially as I was leaning more towards illustration than any other style. Illustration Now! also contains information about each individual’s career path, exhibitions and clients they have worked for.

 

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@Supermarkets: Package Designs by Kaoru Takahashi

I came across this book at a Christmas bazaar back in 2010. It is really interesting to look at the packaging styles and methods that some of the most well known companies use. It is also fascinating to see how competing  brands package their goods to try and sell their products.

 

 

 

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Handmade Graphics: Tools and Techniques Beyond the Mouse by Anna Wray

While studying graphic design, I became more interested in designing by hand rather than on a computer. Handmade Graphics is a very useful book that shows you how you can produce designs without digital input. There are also a few tutorials you can follow for each set of examples showcased.

 

 

 

 

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Fingerprint: The Art of Using Handmade Elements in Graphic Design and Fingerprint No.2: The Evolution of Handmade Elements in Graphic Design by Chen Design Associates

These two volumes feature hundreds of examples of design outcomes produced by hand. All of these have been used successfully in the real world. It is amazing the lengths that some designers go to achieve by hand what a computer could achieve (although less authentically) in a few minutes. There are also a handful of essays written by leading designers about the benefits and their experience of producing handmade designs.

88466511039320210247456 Graphis Annuals 

Every year Graphis publishes annuals for a variety of disciplines . Artists and designers submit their work and the winners get featured in the relevant annual. I own three annuals: Design 2010, Posters 2010 and Posters 2011. I have turned to these books quite often when lacking inspiration as they contain so many original ideas.

I hope you will find these books as useful as I have found them. Do you have any recommendations of books to turn to when in need of inspiration?

 

 

Think. Draw. Create.

28096614Think. Draw. Create.
Written by Frances Prior-Reeves
Illustrated by Eleanor Carter

 

 

In the spring of 2015, a very kind friend of mine presented me with this book as a present in order to keep me busy. Each page has an empty space for the artist to draw their own illustration based on a specific instruction. Below are a few of my outcomes. (Some are based on other drawings I have seen, others are from my own imagination or photographs.) I have many more pages still to complete!

Published in 2014 Think. Draw. Create. provides artists, amateurs, adults and children with a space to nurture their creative thinking. Beautifully set out, each page has a different instruction that requires thought before putting pen to paper.

These instructions are not the typical commands you may expect; instead they are often open and result in a variety of interpretations: for example “Draw orange ignoring red” and “Draw the future in this crystal ball.”

I highly recommend this book to other artists who want to develop their own illustration style or to practice their drawings. It helps to keep the mind active and will benefit those who want to get a job in the art field where they may need to be able to think of original ideas on the spot.